11 October 2011

Recipe box: Using your food storage to make Bannock Bread

Bannock Bread: simple and easy to make
This is a very, very basic bread, made using basic food storage ingredients. If you're used to regular, commercial sandwich breads, this will be different. It's a denser, heavier bread, but still quite tasty.

Plus, this can be made in a frying pan or Dutch oven, over whatever heat source you have available, which makes it great for camping or preparedness!

Ingredients (serves 1 – 2)

1 cup Flour, whole wheat
1/4 tsp. Salt
2 Tbs. Powdered Milk
1 tsp. Baking Powder
1/2 cup Water (approx.)

Directions
  1. Mix all dry ingredients together in a medium bowl.
  2. Add water gradually, stirring all the while. Stir until your have a stiff dough. You may need to add a little more or less than a 1/2 cup of water, but be sparing so that you don't end up with runny dough.
  3. Lightly grease a frying pan and heat the pan over medium-low heat.
  4. Flatten the dough into a rough disc less than a 1/2 inch thick and place it in the pan.
  5. Cook the bread until browned on the bottom, then flip it over.
  6. Cook the bread on the other side until lightly browned.
  7. Check the center of the bread with a toothpick; when the pick comes out clean, the bread is done.
  8. After browning the top of the Bannock Bread
  9. Remove the bread to a plate or rack and let cool a few minutes before serving.

Notes/Substitutions/Additions

When I make Bannock Bread, I used whole wheat flour, which makes a denser end product. If you substitute all-purpose flour, you'll end up with an airier bread.

This is a pretty plain bread. If you'd like something a little sweeter, add 2 Tbs. of honey. When adding the honey, be sure to reduce the amount of water used to about 3/8 cup. Again, you may need to adjust this up or down slightly to ensure that your dough isn't too runny.

When cooked, you can cut your bread edgewise into "buns", then cut them in half  to make two sandwiches. Alternatively, we cut ours into strips about 3/4" wide, and use them like breadsticks.

If your bread is browned on the outside, but still somewhat wet in the middle, simply cut it in half edgewise and then cook the cut side in your pan for a bit longer.

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